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This Just In: Advertising Wants In Your iPod

So I’m a bit skeptical on the issue because we’ve addressed it before on The Media Backpage.  The issue is how can the advertising community best utilize the latest craze of video iPods?  Advertisers are still navigating these unfamiliar waters with the further development of the video iPod and recently companies are trying to take their traditional 30-second spots for television and reformat them for your iPod.  This is the wrong approach.  Advertising executives need to think outside their traditional realm as video blogs and programs are their own medium and need to attract uniquely crafted messages.  The sooner companies learn how to capitalize on this new medium, the better chance they have of getting their product or service noticed by this ever-growing population.  Keep monitoring the trend on The Media Backpage – we’re all over this...

The Old Media Model is Dead

As today’s media landscape continues yesterday’s business models are becoming history.  Audiences are finding new and unique ways to consume media.  Instead of watching your favorite television program on Thursday’s at 8PM now you simply "TiVo" it and watch it when it’s convenient for you, or watch it at a later date on DVD.  The news is no longer at 11 – but rather when you’re ready at 11:07.  Your favorite radio station used to cover about a 100 square mile radius, now thanks to satellite radio it covers the entire country.  In the past, it took almost a year from the box-office to our dens, today movies are available with weeks. (Actually, with Steven Sodenberg’s latest release – Bubble – the movie was released in the theatre and on DVD on the same day.)   As we explained in our introductory post, yesterday’s media business models are experiencing dynamic changes.  This recent article from New York Magazine does a great job of driving home the point about how technologies, such as the TiVo and the iPod, have changed how the media system works, and relegated the old media rules to the history...

Sirius: STOP Pirating Howard

Yeah…that will work.  In a "shocking" statement from Sirius, cease-and-desist letters have been sent out to online pirates, hearhoward100.com and hearhoward.org in a move to try and stop the "king of all media" from being heard for free.  After his satellite debut on January 9th, pirate radio stations around NY as well as other major markets began to retransmit the Sirius program on terrestrial (free) radio.  I can’t imagine who was more thrilled, Sirius (by losing potential consumers) or the FCC (with Stern uncensored roaming on the FM dial).  Pirating Howard is nothing new, it has been occurring for years.  However, the issue is about dollars and cents now.  With Sirius costing consumers $13 a month, if their is a free alternative, people will flock to it.  There is little doubt Sirius will do everything in their power to eliminate the free transmission of Howard Stern’s program with as much as $500 million invested in him.  Sirius spokesman Patrick Reilly said, "We don’t condone the stealing of Howard’s show, or any of the content on our more than 125 channels. We vigorously protect our intellectual property rights and we will actively prosecute those who attempt to steal it." TheStreet.com put the scenario best: if water fountains started spraying free Coca-Cola. In that case, who’d want to part with four quarters for a bottle of...

The Sopranos & the Genius of HBO

With The Sopranos next season slated to start on March 12, I thought it would be a good time to take a look at what makes HBO so unique.  While the networks fight to retain audience share, the cable network, HBO, retains paying viewers with relevant and unique content like Sex in the City, and Entourage.  While HBO is often the subject of water cooler talk they program and operate under a different set of rules from the rest of the television industry.  Not only does HBO charge for their programming and keep subscribers locked in between seasons, they also tend to counter program the traditional November or February Sweeps periods.  Instead HBO runs their most popular shows during network TV’s off months such as January, March and July. This strategy allows HBO to capitalize on an unsaturated market for hype, to have few new network shows to compete against, and perhaps most importantly, by staggering their programming it ensures that subscribers keep doing just that, subscribing between and throughout seasons. In short, HBO seems to have developed its own paradigm that allows it to create a win-win solution for the network and its audience. Now, I’m glad that I never cancelled that HBO subscription, because in just a few short weeks everyone’s favorite mob family...

Updated: Disney Will Have an Extreme Makeover

There are a number of articles, like this one, from the Mercury News that are making the rounds these days about how through a series of actions Steve Jobs could rise to power to run Disney and what the implications would be for the media industry. How does such a scenario develop?  Well, if Disney completes a deal to buy Pixar, the animation studio that created hits Toy Story and Finding Nemo, then Jobs, who is already Pixar’s CEO would obtain Disney stock as part of the deal.  In actuality, he would probably end up with enough stock to put him on Disney’s board and perhaps even the chairman’s seat. So, how does that sit within the modern media landscape?  While, it may remind you of the failed AOL-Time Warner merger, which, was orchestrated to fuse AOL’s online portal with the Time Warner’s vast content library, the outcome will be much different.  While there could be questions as to why this mega-merger would have a different outcome.  Basically, there are two major differences between the AOL-TW merger and Disney and Pixar situation.  First, the AOL and Time Warner deal happened before broadband was widely deployed in American homes, which allows consumers to download larger media content such as songs and video content.  Secondly, there was no device nor the ability to mobilize AOL’s content whereas a Disney/Pixar deal would bring together not only two content behemoths but one of today’s hottest technology providers. If the Disney-Pixar deal does take foot expect Steve Jobs – in whatever capacity he is in the corporate hierarchy – to use the newfound position to influence the...